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soon to tell, but this could be a long war. >> pakistan is no stranger to political turmoil, and today they were reunited after the supreme court ordered the arrest of the prime minister on charges of corruption. from islamabad, we report. >> morning in islamabad. the day began with chaos near parliament. police firing in the air, saying they were shot at first by anti- government protesters. they say this is a peaceful revolution, that the government must go. this rally is just one challenge facing pakistan's leaders. this afternoon, there was another. protesters were euphoric when news broke that the prime minister was to be arrested. the celebration has really begun here. the crowd has just heard the news that the supreme court has ordered the arrest of pakistan's prime minister. people believe the timing shows that things are moving their way. they believe it is a victory for them. protesters say this is just the beginning of the change. >> the whole system will be changed. tos is the first step, remove the prime minister. >> here is the prime minister of arriving at the supreme co
supporters there in caracas. police in pakistan are still trying to find out the identity of a man who was killed for allegedly desecrating the quran. the victim was in police custody when angry villagers dragged him out of a cell, beat him to death and set his body on fire. the province where the incident happened, you may find some of the images in the report disturbing. >> this man was taken from a police station in the sindh province in pakistan, murdered for allegedly desecrating the quran. police officials describe that hundreds of villagers came to the police station, took out the man from behind these very bars, took him to the second floor, dropped his body to the floor and set his body alight. seven police officials have been suspended since the killing last month. they were unable to protect a man under his custody and did not have a name for him but they say the mob overpowered them after storming the police station. it is a tranquil village and people allowed the man to stay the night in the local mosque but say they woke up to burned pages of the quran and allegedly caugh
factions of pakistani tribal fighters who have struck deals with the government. in 2007 he held pakistan and security forces -- helped pakistan and security forces. he said the enemy was u.s. forces across the border. >> the groups are united as we're fighting for one cause, against all those were against islam. >> his killing will not bode well for the peace talks with the taliban. it comes at a time when the u.s. and pakistan are making efforts to engage with them. pakistan said the program was counterproductive and of violation of its sovereignty. -- a violation of its sovereignty. >> they have eliminated a crucial link, whether it has any major impact on the reconciliation process, it is difficult to say at the moment. there is someone else who could walk into the footsteps. >> u.s. troops are said to leave in 2014. this death could further jeopardize the prospects of these future -- of a future deal. the killing also coincides with a conditional offer by the pakistanis about a possible cease-fire. military leaders are due to meet on friday. the killing is expected to have an impact
after recent problems. boeing maintains it is safe to fly. thousands of protesters in front of pakistan's government, the cleric is holding talks with the government. as of the ruling coalition are negotiating with him after he threatened further action. he wants the government to resign. there's no sign the prime minister will heed his call. the anti-corruption chief of pakistan has been depending the prime minister at the supreme court. he says and ordered to arrest the prime minister is flawed. kamal, i don't know if you have been watching the footage of the pakistani foreign minister is saying that khadri is nobody. so why is the government engaging in talks with him? >> as you said, who is he? many people in pakistan say if he were so insignificant, how is it that he has brought the government to its knees? some parts of the city are paralyzed. people wanting to march on parliament. he was speaking from inside his bulletproof container, sipping hot coffee while is the ots, women and children, were sitting out in the pounding rain. that's when he gave the ultimatum, saying that he w
. it has to be better in pakistan. >> 50 immigrants are returning to pakistan today. they are going back home to one of the world's most dangerous regions. the greek government says they are taking part in a voluntary scheme. if you partnership, it has provided the refugees with a ticket home and paid them 300 euros each to leave -- with eu partnership. but muhammed does not feel like he has a choice. he sees this as his only way out. >> greece wants to be rid of us. they want to keep the jobs for themselves. they have become real racists, and they want us to go. >> he had thought that athens would be his gateway to the european union, but the dream did not last long. we join him for his last two days in greece. he now knows that asylum seekers here receive no help from the state, and processing the application can take years. that leaves a lot of refugees with no documentation. another man waited for five years to process this application after he escaped from the taliban. this is how he lived in greece -- schering cramped quarters with three others with no windows -- sharing cramped qu
. that means there is huge room for catching up. and then, of course, there is pakistan, bangladesh, vietnam, many countries in asia. so i'm quite optimistic about the long term growth prospect of asia as a whole. >> reporter: the asian economy has stayed relatively firm despite a recession in europe and a slowdown in the u.s. but kudo points out that more cooperation is needed in the region to prepare for further headwinds. >> i think countries should create more to try to stabilize interregional relationship. most of the countries have no capital and they trade freely. it has been at the center of the regional cooperation in asia and it needs regional development and will continue to be so or they must strengthen their activities in the area of regional corporation integration. >> a pakistani girl who was shot by islamic militants has been discharged from a british hospital. the hospital said that the 15-year-old left the day before because shes with well enough to stay with her family in britain. she was shot in the head in october by the pakistani taliban for supporting girls' rights to
a government. the pakistan community feels they're being unfairly punished for their beliefs following a graveyard attack. a man tied up a guard and 21 others before smashing more than 100 gravestones. >> the difference between the two halves of this one graveyard is plain to see. one side is neat and orderly, the other smashed to pieces. on december 3 at around one dozen men stormed the cemetery in the middle of the night. armed with guns, pickaxes, and sledgehammers, they set upon these graves, determined to destroy tombstones inscribed with koranic verse is. most are regarded as heretics because they believe there was a profit after muhammad. many frown on muslim prayers and epitaphs. the spokesman did not want to show his face because he feared he would be punished for speaking out. he told me the attack did not come as a complete surprise. >> they wanted us to remove all the islamic text which had been written on the tombstones. >> the discriminant -- the discrimination faced by them is unsurprising because in many ways it is mandated by the state. in 1974, pakistan was first elec
strikes in a number of countries including somalia, pakistan, afghanistan, and yemen. the inquiry will look at 25 separate from strikes including a u.s. attack in pakistan in 2011 where up to 40 civilians are reported to have been killed. in syria today, war planes continued to bomb rubble-held areas near the capital as president assad was shown on television and attending a mosque service to mark the birthday of the prophet. every day, thousands of refugees to flee the violence. the strain on those trying to shelter them is enormous. we have been to a camp in jordan. >> small figures and a vast crisis. every night now, they come in their thousands. most are women and children, terrorized by war. for the children, how frightening is it? >> they keep screaming. they cannot sleep. they cry all the time. >> in the distance and in the country behind them, smoke rises from an explosion. on this side of the border, they meet soldiers to try to help, not kill. >> at each border crossing, or forces are there to receive them. we take them somewhere south, to restore their sense of security
and the soviets. from the pakistan border to the atlantic ocean, you will have something like this, get ready >> are they the same it. ideologically as al qaeda in iraq? >> there are experts that can talk about that. by and large what they represent is extreme for the political islamic theological movements including using violence with anybody that disagree with them. that is what is in common for all of these organizations. calling them al qaeda is loose association. a few years earlier, they invited the city terrorists in iraq to join them as well. so you get these offshoots that are only loosely connected organizations. but they do have a similar theological and political agenda. >> how much of a threat do they represent to americans here? >> of algeria is an important energy exporter and an important country. this is a threat to of jury out. we see the expansion of rebels and these groups coming in, this is a potent threat and a huge area that needs to be dealt with. >> to syria where the bbc team has found evidence of a massacre that takes place on the edge of palms. our international c
their sponsor, u.s. postal service. al jazeera, los angeles. >> protests in the pakistan capital have ended. the government reached a deal with the leader of the demonstrators. farmers in peru are putting the agricultural future of the country in jeopardy. >> if you are crossing the u.k. right now, you know is snowing. that will continue through friday. toward scotland, the tigers are love in the snow. they are meant for this type of weather. temperatures got down to - 4. these tigers can handle up to - 40 degrees because of their thick coat. toward saturday, things will be clearing across the u.k. down here is where the rain is going to be a major problem, especially in northern portugal and northern spain. we expect to see up to 150 kiloliters of rain in the next few days. across northern africa, who did see some clouds across libya. it is clearing out across benghazi. toward tripoli, which expect to see -- we expect to see 20 as well. that will last the next couple days. toward nigeria, we expect to see rain the next few days. down the mountain. we are determined to stop them. >> saturda
with potential conflicts with territorial disputes in the south china sea. we had india and pakistan. we had new instability in northern africa. we have syria. we have a number of crises potentially multiplying, but i do not see a different or strong or old set of initiatives from the u.s. i hope so. ink tv. >> hello, the top stories. troops have retaken two central towns from rebel groups. the government extended the state of emergency by three months. soldiers in retreat briefly seized the information ministry. they have reportedly called on the government to pass a draft constitution and release political prisoners. the u.s. capital is holding celebrations for the inauguration of president obama's second term. he pledges to bring down the more than 16 trillion dollar debt. the algerian government has been given details of last week's hostage crisis. the prime minister confirmed at least 37 foreign workers were killed. five others were unaccounted for. the workers killed were from japan, america, britain, france, and the philippines. a hostage takers came from egypt, canada, mauritania, and tu
, due to treatment at a hospital in the united kingdom where she was transferred from pakistan. malala was discharged earlier this month. she's currently in rehabilitation, supported by her family who are also now in britain. a physician treating malala told a news conference on wednesday that she would soon have another operatatatatat in her left ear when the gunshot broke her eardrum and other tissue in her head. during the operation, malala's head wound will be covered with a metal plate. doctors will install a small electronic device to improve her hearing. >> this is primary to offer physical protection to her brain in the same way as a normal skull was -- would. she remains incredibly cheerful, incredibly determined and -- to continue to speak for her cause. she really is a remarkable young lady. >> the operation is scheduled to take place within the next ten days. the doctor said malala will need to remain in britain for the time being. and that a full recovery is still more than a year away. >>> participants in a u.n. disarmament conference have voiced negative views about japa
vaccines in afghanistan have been killed in pakistan have been killed. it is the number of attacks in the past month to 12. gabrielle giffords has called for action to stop gun violence, speaking at the first senate hearing to happen since the massacre last month in which 20 children and six adults were killed. she says congress must act and, in her words, be bold. we are here to catch up on me business -- on the business. earlier, the mood around greece was good. here we are talking about a strike. >> we had the greek finance minister saying that -- only a couple of days ago, things are looking good. this is the last year of recession. yet today, we are seeing tens of thousands of transport workers -- cities left without buses, trams, trains. the message is not really getting through. let me explain more. as george mentioned, there is some growing optimism that greece will remain in the euro. the greek stock market has soared over the last year from a little -- from a very low base. transport workers are staging another 24-hour stoppage today. a doctor strike has left hospitals f
. they now risk being arrested. mobile phone services in pakistan have been suspended a hell of celebrations -- have been suspended ahead of celebrations for the prophet muhammad. the government suspended services and stepped up security to prevent any military attack. events promoting gay rights could be banned throughout russia as the country's parliament adopt a controversial rule to end what it calls homosexual propaganda. in the next few minutes we should know whether andy murr ay or roger federer wins the australian open. now we have all of the business news. jamie, we have to start with an astounding performance from samsung, suggesting they are kings of the phone market. >> 700,000 smartphones. i could not believe there were quite so many every single day. it outshines apple. they overtook apple last year, so they are the number 1 smartphone mfg.. >> is this really about price? are samsung doing well because they are more competitive? >> no, they have a wider range. they can compete alone, where apple does not go. they have also got a very good product line coming out. the mobile pho
. >>> pakistan says indian troops attacked a military post today killing one soldier. indian's army is accuse offend crossing the border in kashmir which is known as the line of control between pakistan and india. a pakistani military statement said fighting continues in the region. >>> retired general stanley mcchrystal is speaking out for the first time since he resigned more than two years ago. in his new memoir he accepts blame for a "rolling stone" article that ended his career and also questions the article's fairness and accuracy. he was the top commander in afghanistan when he resigned and stepped down after the article quoted his aides criticizing president obama's team, including vice president biden. >>> those are your headlines "reliable sources" is at the top of the hour and now back to fareed zakaria "gps. quaes. >>> shame, elation, confusion, irstation, disbelief. those were just some of the emotions americans felt this week as they watched the painful process of democracy in action or in inaction as they went over the fiscal cliff. i was in london. i was furious how it all loo
injuries she sustained. it's interesting, that question, because over the past couple of days, the pakistan government has announced it's given a job to malala yousafzai's dad, the job as the education attache in the pakistani consulate in birmingham, which is right where the hospital is. and that's for the next three years. malala obviously has to go through a lot of treatment, so that enables the family at least temporarily to stay in britain for the next three years. even though the father says ultimately he wants to go back to pakistan, there is this huge threat hanging over his family. the taliban say still they're going to finish off the job, as it were, they're still going to try to kill malala yousafzai if she goes back. so my suspicion is she may stay there for a significant period of time. >> along those lines, what is the security or protection for her, given this vow by the taliban to continue to try and find her and kill her? >>> a "360 follow" now. the u.s. supreme court today agreed to decide who will get to raise this little girl. her name is veronica. she's 3 years old and
acknowledged we have a drone program but the argument ends like somalia and yemen and pakistan has been the consents of the government to hunt down bad guys and kill them to benefit us and them as well. i don't know that that is the legal rationale for those strikes. >> there is a distinction. i think the government can make a strong argument based on the commander in chief's power under the constitution that there's a right to protect action to protect the united states. is a slippery slope when you see how far it goes and that is independent of authorization of the use of military force. authorization, passage by congress of something of a rising it makes the power structure, justice jackson said when you have congress and the president to get rid is hard to do it but they can argue on the constitution. one of the differences is the right to the teen people is always something that has been covered aside from killing them, the right to detain people has always been something in the traditional branch covered by a judicial review in the law. you may have more right to use force than yo
for islamist militants from pakistan. the assault killed more than 160 people, including six americans. headley could have gotten life in prison, but federal prosecutors in chicago asked for a more lenient sentence, citing his cooperation. the united nations opened a special investigation today into drone warfare. it will focus on civilian casualties resulting from strikes aimed at suspected terror cells. under president obama, the c.i.a. has stepped up drone attacks, especially in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, first-time claims for unemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspond
for the iranians of the north koreans are the pakistans or others to design. so what would happen if one of these things as part of in downtown manhattan? well, the map shows with certain assumptions about when speed and other factors with the devastation would be. of course, it is worse around ground zero and getting a little bit better as you go farther out but the estimate in this scientific journal is that this relatively small nuclear device would injured about one-half million people and killed over 600,000 people just from being set off in lower manhattan. of course, you would see similar devastation if one were to be set off your in washington. no, i don't mean to alarm anybody here, but i think we need to think about these kinds of dangers because they are not going away. as the iranian nuclear program accelerates, as pakistan destabilizes, these are very real possibilities that we have to think very hard about. rome was brought down by barbarians. we have to be very careful that we ourselves are not brought down by barbarians. i think the first defense is to understand the natu
blackberry's fortunes rise again? >> the injury suffered by an activist in pakistan were so intense that a piece of her skull ended up in her abdomen. now, they will prepare to remove it and put it back in her skull. the doctors said she had made a remarkable recovery. >> her injury was life- threatening. a recovery so far is described as remarkable. weeks after malala yousafzai walked out of the hospital, they are preparing for her next major challenge. the government's bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. -- the attackers bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. now, they are preparing a titanium plate to repair the whole. >> this is a small defect. this is very adaptable. this is an easy battle to work with. >> malala yousafzai was attacked for defying a taliban edict. shot in the head at point-blank range as she traveled home from school. the taliban gunmen left her for dead but she emerged at the chaos of life. there was emergency surgery in pakistan and then the airlift to birmingham possible class medical facilities. her story has become a global news. a school
strikes in a number of countries including somalia pakistan, afghanistan and yemen. the inquiry will look at 25 separate from strikes including a u.s. attack in pakistan in 2011 where up to 40 civilians are reported to have been killed. in syria today, war planes continued to bomb rubble-held areas near the capital as president assad was shown on television and attending a mosque service to mark the birthday of the profiphet. every day, thousands of refugees to flee the violence. the strain on those trying to shelter them is enormous. we have been to a camp in jordan. >> small figures and a vast crisis. every night now, they come in their thousands. most are women and children, terrorized by war. for the children, how frightening is it? >> they keep screaming. they cannot sleep. they cry all the time. >> in the distance and in the country behind them, smoke rises from an explosion. on this side of the border, they meet soldiers to try to help, not kill. >> at each border crossing, or forces are there to receive them. we take them somewhere south, to restore their sense of security. this i
' education in her native pakistan. it is remarkable, though, and very heartwarming, isn't it, to see these images of malala, the 15-year-old girl, walking away almost unaided, holding the hand of a nurse, in the hospital. she even had the strength to wave to the staff that has been looking after her over the course of the past three months or so since she was evacuated from pakistan with the terrible head injuries. she's going to be located at her temporary home. her family have moved over from pakistan to birmingham in central england near to the hospital. she's going to be going back with her father and mother and two younger brothers. the doctors at the hospital say that will be best for her, but she'll still come back and forth from the hospital to get clinical treatment and she'll also have to be re-admitted according to the hospital as well for cranial reconstruction surgery. her skull was obviously smashed by the bullet that was fired into her head by the taliban gunmen back in october and she still has to undergo a lot of surgery to, you know, kind of make that damage good, s
to the house on monday, is that the risks are changing but we still face the biggest risk from the afghanistan-pakistan area, but the proportion of the risks we face from the very has declined so we are able to use resources as we draw down in afghanistan to cope with the other risks that we face. but the overall point is absolutely that yes, we are going to have a smaller regular army, although the extra reserves will be at the overall level of our army hardly changes the size, but it would be better equipped, more capable, more mobile, more capable of dealing with the modern threats that we face. >> graham stuart. >> tournament. can i congratulate the prime minister on the speech on europe this morning, and -- mr. speaker, this premise has a history of going to bat for britain and the party opposite has a history of going in and surrendering. but can ask the prime minister is the difference between that site and decide. that side wants to deny them. >> i think my honorable friend makes a very important point. frankly, the british public have seen treaty after treaty introduced to this house passing p
are changing. we still face the biggest risk from the afghanistan-pakistan area, but the proportion of the risks that we face from that area has declined. we are able to use resources as we draw down in afghanistan to cope with the other risks that we face. the overall point is absolutely, yes, we are going to have a smaller regular army, although the extra reserves will mean that the overall level of our army hardly changes the size. they will be better equipped, more capable, more mobile, more capable of dealing with the modern threats we face. >> i congratulate the prime minister on his speech on europe this morning. this prime minister has a history of going in to bat for britain. labour party has a history of going in and surrendering things such as the rebate. is not the big difference between that side and that's that this side trusts the people on that side wants them to deny them a say? klutz my honorable friend makes an important point. frankly, the british public have seen treaty after treaty introduced to this house, passing powers from westminster to brussels. they have
mission or return to pakistan? joining us now is the president of act for america, and the author bridgette gabriel. >> good morning, just to recap, let's tell malala's story again. she has been a champion for years of girls education in pakistan. she wants equal rights. she had a blog she spoke out about what was like being a young girl in the swat valley in pakistan, for all of that targeted tore the for the taliban and pulled over her school bus as she was on the way home from school and shot her in the head. miraculously, she survived, thanks to the great work of some pakistan and british doctors. she's now out of the hospital. what's the update on malala and what's next for her? >> she is out of the hospital and her father got a job in britain so her family will remain in britain, where she will be a little bit safer. they will have a little bit of security. but her life, it's going to be an uphill battle trying to protect ser he have from now on because she has become a symbol of freedom to many women in the islamic world and this is why she is he' going to remain a target a
see along the afghan/pakistan border. >> the can of worms is open. if we can't put the can back on how much involvement are you willing to stomach? are you willing to say we will put boots on the ground, something the obama administration does not want to do and the american people do not want to do right now? >> you have to ask. there are a whole series of options here that we can put into play. and it has to be a coordinated effort. this isn't just about mali. the french have very capable special forces. they are going to put hurt on these folks. there are things we can do for them short of boots on the ground. i would encourage the president to continue to do that. if you -- this is going to get worse. you cannot allow this to become a national security issue for the united states. i argue it has crossed that threshold. this area now attracting jihadists and they are really good at this stuff including hostage taking because they have been doing it for decades and have been the largest funder to al qaeda. this is a problem we have to deal with. we all ought to sit down and try to co
in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, rst-time claims founemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> reporter: for john kerry, it was a day long in coming. the diplomat's son, veteran senator, and former democratic presidential nominee has been considered a potential secretary of state for years. >> you've almost lived your entire life for this moment. >> reporter: indeed, kerry first appeared before the senate foreign relations committee in 1971, as a vietnam veteran challenging senators over the war. >> we cannot fight communism all over the world and
constructive support from across the region including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken in that regard and we'll look for more tangible steps because a stable and secure afghanistan is in the interests not only the afghan people and the united states but of the entire region. and finally we reaffirmed the strategic part they are shnersh last year. this includes deepening ties of trade, commerce, strengthening institutions, development, education, and opportunities for all afghans. men and women, boys and girls. and this sends a clear message to afghans and to the regions as afghans stand up, they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governance and development that delivers for the afghan people. and an end t
of pakistan. criticizing the taliban who banned schooling for girls. she was shot in the head and neck and october after her school bus was stopped by taliban gunmen who demand the other children identify her. it provoked calls for a crack down on militants. she was evacuated to britain for medical treatment and an international symbol of courage. hundreds of thousands signed a petition and awarded the nobel peace prize. >> they are subjected to violence all the time and speaking out about their rights, she was a child speaking out about her rights in a very, very difficult context. she spoke how knowing that she could be subjected to violence, what makes it even more interesting is that she had the support of her family, particularly her father to actually speak out. >> the focus is on her first steps. her father has been given a job at pakistan's consulate allowing the family to stay in britain for the years of therapy and medical treatment. that now lies ahead. that job is for a period of at least three years with the possibility of an extension after that according to officials. th
of any reasons to back this up. many of the detainees were arrested by pakistani authorities in pakistan. others were arrested in thailand by the police. you had nashiri who was arrested in to buy another arrested in somalia. the notion that we have to have the special forum that has battlefield conditions is a great smokescreen for this second-rate process that says more about us than about the people we are trying to bring before us. another important piece is the issue of torture. the senate select committee on intelligence completed their report recently and you probably saw john mccain and dianne feinstein said the report concludes torture did not work. they say it was a stain on our reputation. it is important that that report is declassified to the public in light of "zero dark 30." it is about the killing of osama bin laden bin laden. i think the movie will do for torture with jaws did for sharks. it will become the public perception of reality and it is a lie. i think that moving makes it doubly important for the senate select committee to report -- to get the report declassifie
intelligence and drones as we have done in pakistan. we ned to start looking at doing that in northern africa. jenna: we know you are very busy out in virginia. windy virginia, we can hear that on the microphone where the g.o.p. is having their retreat. thank you for your time, stepping out to talk to us about this important story. >> thank you, jenna i appreciate it. jon: some brand-new numbers that show a dramatic drop in cancer deaths in this country. what's behind the decline and how you can stay healthy. that is coming up. plus, the latest on a for reeveryone is talk being about the football star and his fake, dead girlfriend. did sports reporters fumble the ball on this one? our news watch panel is joining us to weigh in. jon: right now the dance world is reeling from a brutal attack on one of its own. the artistic director of one of the world's most renown ballet companies has acid thrown in his face. tpraubg tpraubg has thharris faulkner has the details. >> reporter: he may lose his eyesight. it could have been linked to power struggles at the russian ballet company. 42-year-old forme
. >> this program gave us an enormous amount of information about al qaeda in pakistan. the administration continues to use the intelligence every day in drone strikes. it is not just actable intelligence but how they operate. since the program was shut down we have seen the emergence of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. we have had the emergence of al-shabab merging with al qaeda central. and al qaeda in africa. are we struggling in a way? the information we have on pakistan and the lack of information, is it harder to get the intelligence we need because we do not have this tool? >> one of the most important threads of information that i saw when i got there and still in 2006, late in the game, was detainee information. i already suggested to you that i am willing to adjust the detainee program. we have other penetrations and sources and knowledge. we have a better sense of the imminence of attack, what state of danger we are in as a nation. i told you we entered the black side in 2006. lazy journalists sometimes they we closed them. we did not. we kept the option open for the president. between
drone warfare, as you point out, in pakistan, in yemen, in so many places that we don't really know about. what is the role of the cia, how is the cia partnering up with military troops around the world, where does it all really go from here? this gives them the real opportunity to get them in front of the public in front of tv cameras and ask him these questions, brooke. >> let me ask about chuck hagel. you have to deal with the looming spending cuts, which you know so intimately covering the pentagon for us. do we know where chuck hagel stands on the pentagon's budget specifically? >> well, he has long been an advocate of cutting military spending. he has spoken in the past often about the -- his belief there is bloat in the pentagon budget. so what are we looking at here? in the next couple of months, congress comes back, struggles with the budget, with the fiscal cliff, with the so-called sequestration, perhaps another $500 billion over 10 years in pentagon spending cuts. where will hagel come out on this? because he will be facing, of course, very tough -- very tough lobby by d
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